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Critical & Creative Thinking (CFSD)

CFSD Rubrics for 21st Century Skills: Catalina Foothills School District has developed a series of rubrics to assess students in real time.

Scoring DomainAdvancedProficientBasicNovice
Comparing
  • Selects items that are extremely suitable for addressing the basic objective of the comparison and that show original or creative thinking.
  • Selects characteristics that encompass the most essential aspects of the items and present a unique challenge or provide an unusual thought.
  • Accurately assesses all identified similarities and differences for each item on the selected characteristic. Additionally, the student provides inferences from the comparison that were not explicitly requested in the task description.
    • Selects items that provide a means for successfully addressing the basic objective of the comparison.
    • Selects characteristics that provide a vehicle for meaningful comparison of the items and address the basic objective of the comparison.
    • Accurately assesses the major similarities and differences among the identified characteristics.
      • Selects items that satisfy the basic requirements of the comparison but create some difficulties for completing the task.
      • Selects characteristics that provide for a partial comparison of the items and may include some extraneous characteristics.
      • Makes some important errors in identifying the major similarities and differences among the identified characteristics.
        • Selects items that are inappropriate to the basic objective of the comparison.
        • Selects characteristics that are trivial or do not address the basic objective of the comparison. Selects characteristics on which the items cannot be compared.
        • Makes many significant errors in identifying the major similarities and differences among the identified characteristics.
          Classifying
          • Specifies the items to be classified and selects significant items that present some interesting challenge in classification.
          • Creates categories that provide a useful way of looking at the items at an unusual level of depth.
          • Provides a clear and complete specification of the defining characteristics of each category. Describes the defining characteristics in such a way as to provide a unique or unusual way of looking at the items.
          • Correctly sorts each of the items into the categories and describes the extent to which each item has the characteristics ascribed to the categories. Describes insights gained during the sorting process.
            • Selects significant items for classification that present some challenge in classification
            • Creates categories that focus on the significant characteristics of the items.
            • Clearly specifies the defining characteristics of the categories and addresses any questions of overlap in characteristics.
            • Correctly sorts each of the items into the categories and, when appropriate, describes the extent to which each item has the characteristics ascribed to the categories.
              • Selects items of little significance or presents a routine sorting problem.
              • Creates categories that provide for some analysis of the items but may not include all the important characteristics of the items.
              • Describes the defining characteristics of categories in a way that results in some overlap or confusion between categories, or describes characteristics that are unrelated to the rules for category membership.
              • Makes some errors in assigning items to their appropriate categories, or does not describe the extent to which each item has the characteristics of the category, when it is clearly appropriate for the task.
                • Selects trivial items or items that have no relationship to the task.
                • Creates categories that address only trivial aspects of the items.
                • Identifies characteristics that do not accurately describe the categories. Makes frequent and significant errors in assigning items to categories and does not show how the items have the characteristics of their assigned categories.
                  Inductive Reasoning
                  • Clearly and accurately identifies all relevant information from which to make inductions. The type of information selected reflects c creative insight and a careful analysis of the situation.
                  • Provides accurate interpretations that illustrate insight into the information from which they were made. The interpretations reflect a study of or a familiarity with the particulars of the topic.
                  • Draws conclusions that reflect clear and logical links between the information or observations and the interpretations made from them. The rationale for the interpretations shows a thoughtful and accurate attention to the process of induction.
                    • Specifies all relevant information from which to make inductions. Selects information that is important to the general topic.
                    • Provides interpretations that, with few exceptions, are valid and say somethemng important about the topic.
                    • Presents conclusions that, with few exceptions, follow logically from the selected information or observations.
                      • Includes some information that is not important to the induction or does not accurately identify the important information from which the induction(s) could be made.
                      • Provides some interpretations that are based on significant misunderstandings of the subject matter.
                      • Presents some conclusions that reflect erroneous interpretations made from the information or observations.
                        • Selects unimportant or trivial information for the induction.
                        • Significantly misinterprets the information. Makes interpretations that have no bearing on the area or a re clearly illogical.
                        • Draws many erroneous conclusions from the selected information or observations and cannot satisfactorily describe the rational behind the conclusions.
                          Deductive Reasoning
                          • Selects generalizations or principles that show extreme insight into the topic.
                          • Demonstrates an understanding of the generalizations or principles that is not only accurate but provides a unique perspective on the topic.
                          • Accurately identifies logical conclusions implied by the generalizations or principles. Recognizes more subtle inferences that could have important effects on the subject area.
                            • Selects important generalizations or principles that contribute to the understanding of the topic.
                            • Demonstrates an understanding of the generalizations or principles that is accurate and contributes to an understanding of the topic.
                            • With few errors, accurately identifies the consequences of the generalizations or principles. The consequences relate closely to the subject area and are worthwhile subjects for discussion.
                              • Selects generalizations or principles that generally relate to the information available but that may not have significant explanatory power.
                              • Demonstrates a somewhat inaccurate understanding of the generalizations or principles.
                              • Includes important consequences of the generalizations or principles, but identifies consequences that may not be relevant to the topic; or makes logical errors in identifying the consequences.
                                • Selects generalizations or principles that do not have significant bearing on the material and do not contribute to the understanding of the subject.
                                • Demonstrates an incorrect understanding or interpretation of the generalizations or principles.
                                • Identifies consequences that have little significance and are not logical or relevant to the topic.
                                  Error Analysis
                                  • Accurately identifies all errors in the information or process under study and makes clear why the points identified are errors. Also identifies subtle but important errors that are difficult to recognize.
                                  • Provides an accurate analysis of the effects of the errors, including a complete description of the effects of the errors beyond the most obvious levels of impact.
                                  • Provides a highly thoughtful or creative approach for correcting the errors.
                                    • Accurately identifies all critical errors in the information process under study and makes clear why the points identified are errors.
                                    • Provides an accurate analysis of the effects of the errors, omitting few details.
                                    • Provides a workable way of correcting the errors. The response addresses the major concerns raised by the errors.
                                      • Fails to recognize some important errors or identifies some points that are not errors.
                                      • Describes the effects of the errors, but omits some important consequences; or does not accurately describe all the effects of the errors.
                                      • Provides an approach for correcting the errors. The approach addresses some of the major errors, though it may not be the best or most appropriate response to the situation.
                                        • Recognizes only insignificant errors or mistakes valid points for errors.
                                        • Does not correctly assess the effects of the errors, or describes effects that do not exist.
                                        • Does not accurately describe how to correct the errors.
                                          Constructing Support
                                          • Accurately identifies a claim that requires support. The identified claim has been mistaken by many others for a fact that requires no support.
                                          • Presents a clear and accurate treatment of all available evidence that addresses the central point of the claim. Considers what evidence is missing and how it should affect an evaluation of the claim.
                                          • Provides careful and reasoned qualifications or restrictions for the claim in such a way that the argument provides a unique perspective on the claim.
                                            • Accurately identifies a claim that requires support and does not confuse the claim with any other information.
                                            • With no major errors, presents all relevant evidence needed to support the claim.
                                            • Provides accurate qualifications or restrictions for the claim, with the result being a well-??defended claim.
                                              • Identifies a claim that requires support but may mistakenly include information that does not require support.
                                              • Provides evidence for the claim, but may not address all necessary aspects.
                                              • Qualifies or restricts the claim, but leaves out important aspects of the qualifications or restrictions.
                                                • Identifies information that does not require support and fails to identify a claim that should have support.
                                                • Fails to provide convincing evidence for the claim.
                                                • Does not address qualifications or restrictions for the claim.
                                                  Abstracting
                                                  • Identifies a situation or information that provides a rich source of material for abstracting, which may not be commonly used, but has a pattern that could be powerful when abstracted.
                                                  • Identifies a general or abstract pattern that provides novel insights into the information studied. The pattern furnishes the means for seeing other material from a unique perspective.
                                                  • Demonstrates creativity in the selection of another situation or information that contains a similar general or abstract form. The situation or information is important and provides a suitable subject for analysis.
                                                    • Identifies significant information that also has a pattern that lends itself to the abstracting process.
                                                    • Constructs a general or abstract pattern that accurately represents the information from which it came.
                                                    • Correctly identifies another situation or set of information that contains the essential characteristics of the general or abstract form and provides a worthwhile subject for study.
                                                      • Identifies information that seems unimportant but does have a pattern that can be used in the abstracting process.
                                                      • Creates a general or abstract pattern that may not be a completely accurate representation of the information or situation from which it was drawn but does focus on its most important elements.
                                                      • Identifies another situation or set of information that does perfectly match the general or abstract form but has some similarities.
                                                        • Identifies trivial information having no identifiable pattern that can be used in the abstracting process.
                                                        • Does not create a general or abstract pattern that accurately represents the information or situation selected.
                                                        • Selects another situation or set of information that does not conform in any way to the general or abstract pattern identified.
                                                          Analyzing Perspectives
                                                          • Identifies and articulates implicit points of disagreement that are not obvious but are the underlying cause of conflict.
                                                          • Articulates a detailed position and the reasoning behind it and, if a strong line of reasoning does not underlie the position, articulates the errors or holes in the reasoning.
                                                          • Articulates a detailed opposing position and the reasoning behind it. If a strong line of reasoning does not underlie the position, articulates the errors or holes in the reasoning.
                                                            • Identifies and articulates explicit points of disagreement that cause conflict.
                                                            • Articulates a position and the basic reasoning underlying the position. Does not address or incompletely addresses the errors or holes in the reasoning.
                                                            • Articulates an opposing position and the basic reasoning underlying it. Does not address or incompletely addresses the errors or holes in the reasoning.
                                                              • Identifies and articulates issues that are not points of disagreement as important points of disagreement.
                                                              • Articulates a position but does not present a clear line of reasoning behind it.
                                                              • Articulates an opposing position, but does not present a clear line of reasoning behind it.
                                                                • Ignores explicit and implicit points of disagreement.
                                                                • Does not articulate a clear position.
                                                                • Does not articulate a clear opposing position.
                                                                  Decision Making
                                                                  • Presents a comprehensive list of the most important possible alternatives and describes each in detail.
                                                                  • Clearly identifies the criteria by which the identified alternatives will be assessed. The criteria reflect an unusually thorough understanding of the nature of the decision task.
                                                                  • Provides a thorough, fully developed assessment of each alternative based upon the criteria. Exceeds the demands of the decision task by comparing and contrasting the alternatives to provide greater insights.
                                                                  • Selects an alternative that meets or exceeds the criteria and represents a well- supported answer to the initial decision question. Provides a useful discussion of issues and insights that arose during the selection process.
                                                                    • Identifies alternatives that represent most of the important possible alternatives.
                                                                    • Clearly identifies the criteria by which the identified alternatives will be assessed. With no significant exceptions, the criteria are important to the decision task.
                                                                    • Presents an accurate assessment of the extent to which the alternatives possess the identified criteria.
                                                                    • Successfully answers the decision question by selecting an alternative that meets or exceeds established criteria.
                                                                      • Identifies some alternatives that are important and others that are not.
                                                                      • Identifies some important criteria by which the identified alternatives will be assessed. However, some important criteria are omitted, or criteria are included that may not be important to the task.
                                                                      • Does not completely address all the criteria; or applies all appropriate criteria to the alternatives but is not completely accurate in assessing how well the criteria have been met.
                                                                      • Selects an alternative that does not entirely conform to the student's assessment of the alternatives.
                                                                        • Selects alternatives that are clearly not relevant to the decision.
                                                                        • Identifies few or no criteria that are relevant to the decision task.
                                                                        • Does not address the extent to which the alternatives meet the criteria or is inaccurate in assessing how well the alternatives meet the criteria.
                                                                        • Makes a selection that does not appear reasonable or cannot be justified by the student's evaluation of the alternatives.
                                                                          Investigation
                                                                          • Presents a thorough and correct account of what is already known. Supplies information that may not be commonly known, but that has some bearing on the topic being studied.
                                                                          • Identifies the important confusions, uncertainties or contradictions surrounding the topic. Brings to light misconceptions or confusions that are commonly overlooked.
                                                                          • Provides a logical and well-developed resolution to the confusions, uncertainties, or contradictions. The resolution reflects creative thinking as well as thoughtful attention to the details of the problem.
                                                                            • Presents an accurate account, with no important omissions, of what is already known or agreed upon about the topic being studied.
                                                                            • Identifies, with no important errors, significant confusions, uncertainties, or contradictions surrounding the topic.
                                                                            • Presents a clear resolution to the problems associated with the concept. The resolution is a logical and plausible outcome of the investigation.
                                                                              • Presents information on what is already known or agreed upon about the topic being studied, however the information may not be complete in all particulars, or the student may introduce some inaccuracies.
                                                                              • Identifies confusion, uncertainties, or contradictions associated with the topic. The problems identified include some, but not all, of the most critical issues.
                                                                              • Develops and presents a resolution to the problems associated with the concept. The resolution is satisfactory, but lacks thorough treatment and accuracy.
                                                                                • Presents little or no accurate and important information about what is already known or agreed upon about the topic.
                                                                                • Fails to accurately identify any important confusions, uncertainties, or contradictions surrounding the topic.
                                                                                • Presents an unsubstantiated and implausible resolution to the confusions, uncertainties, or contradictions.
                                                                                  Problem Solving
                                                                                  • Accurately and thoroughly describes the relevant constraints or obstacles. Addresses obstacles or constraints that are not immediately apparent.
                                                                                  • Identifies creative but plausible solutions to the problem under consideration. The solutions address the central difficulties posed by the constraint or obstacle.
                                                                                  • Engages in effective, valid, and exhaustive trials of the selected alternatives. Trials go beyond those required to solve the problem and show a commitment to an in-depth understanding of the problem.
                                                                                  • Provides a clear, comprehensive summary of the reasoning that led to the selection of secondary solutions. The description includes a review of the decisions that produced the order of selection and how each alternative fared as a solution.
                                                                                    • Accurately identifies the most important constraints or obstacles.
                                                                                    • Proposes alternative solutions that appear plausible and that address the most important constraints or obstacles.
                                                                                    • Puts the selected alternative to trials adequate to determine their utility.
                                                                                    • Describes the process that led to the ordering of secondary solutions. The description offers a clear, defensible rational for the ordering of alternatives, and the final selection.
                                                                                      • Identifies some constraints or obstacles that are accurate along with some that are not accurate.
                                                                                      • Presents alternative solutions for dealing with the obstacles or constraints, but the solutions do not all address the important difficulties.
                                                                                      • Tries out the alternatives, but the trials are incomplete and important elements are omitted or ignored.
                                                                                      • Describes the processes that led to the ordering of secondary solutions. The description does not provide a clear rational for the ordering of alternatives that were tried.
                                                                                        • Omits the most significant constraints and obstacles.
                                                                                        • Presents solutions that fail to address critical parts of the problem.
                                                                                        • Does not satisfactorily test the selected solutions.
                                                                                        • Describes and illogical method for determining the relative value of the alternatives. The student does not present a reasonable review of the strengths and weaknesses of the alternative solutions that were tried and abandoned.
                                                                                          Experimental Inquiry
                                                                                          • Provides and accurate explanation of the phenomenon. The facts, concepts, or principles used for the explanation are appropriate to the phenomenon and accurately applied. The explanation reflects thorough and careful research or understanding.
                                                                                          • Makes a verifiable prediction that reflects insight into the character of the phenomenon. The prediction is entirely appropriate to the facts, concepts, or principles used to explain the phenomenon.
                                                                                          • Sets up and carries out an experiment that is a complete and valid test of the prediction and addresses all important questions raised by the prediction. The activity or experiment is designed to provide complete and accurate data and a model of the experimental design.
                                                                                          • Provided a complete and accurate explanation of the outcome of the activity or experiment and does so in terms of the relevant facts,concepts, or principles. Provides insights into the nature of the phenomenon studied or the facts, concepts, and principles used to explain it.
                                                                                            • Provides and accurate explanation of the phenomenon. The facts, concepts, or principles used in the explanation are appropriate to the phenomenon and accurately applied, with no significant errors.
                                                                                            • Makes a prediction that follows from the facts, concepts, or principles used to explain the phenomenon. The prediction can be verified.
                                                                                            • Sets up and carries out an activity or experiment that is a fair test of the prediction and addresses the most important questions raised by the prediction. The activity or experiment provides accurate data for evaluation.
                                                                                            • Provides a complete explanation of the outcome of the activity or experiment with no important errors. Presents the explanation in terms of the relevant facts, concepts, or principles.
                                                                                              • Explains the phenomenon but misapplies or omits facts, concepts, or principles that are important for understanding the phenomenon.
                                                                                              • Makes a prediction that reflects a misunderstanding of some aspects of the facts, concepts, principles used to explain the phenomenon, or makes a prediction that presents difficulties for verification.
                                                                                              • Sets up and carries out an activity or experiment that addresses some important aspects of the prediction, but omits others. The design of the activity or experiment produces some errors in data collection or interpretation.
                                                                                              • Provides a general explanation of the outcome of the activity or experiment but omits one or two important aspects, or may not effectively relate the outcome to the facts, concepts, or principles used to generate the prediction.
                                                                                                • Leaves out key facts, concepts, or principles in explaining phenomenon, or does not use appropriate facts, concept, or principles to explain the phenomenon.
                                                                                                • Makes a prediction that cannot be verified.
                                                                                                • Sets up and carries out an activity or experiment that does not test the central features of the prediction. The experimental design is seriously flawed and the collection of data is unlikely.
                                                                                                • Provides an inaccurate highly flawed explanation of how the outcome relates to the original explanation.
                                                                                                  Data Analysis: Develop a Question
                                                                                                  Develops a question that can be used to guide valid data collection and justify choice in relation to other possible questions.
                                                                                                    Develops a question that can be used to guide valid data collection.
                                                                                                      Develops a question that leads to opinionated/biased data.
                                                                                                        Develops a question that does not lead to data collection.
                                                                                                          Data Analysis: Collect Data
                                                                                                          Collects data that is accurate and relevant through efficient methods.
                                                                                                            Collects data that is accurate and relevant.
                                                                                                              Collects data that is either accurate or relevant.
                                                                                                                Collects data that is neither accurate nor relevant.
                                                                                                                  Data Analysis: Collect Data
                                                                                                                  Chooses a sample that is representative, and of sufficient size that extends beyond the immediate environment.
                                                                                                                    Chooses a sample that is representative of and a sufficient size.
                                                                                                                      Chooses a sample that is either representative or of sufficient size.
                                                                                                                        Chooses a sample that is neither representative nor of sufficient
                                                                                                                          Data Analysis: Organize and Display Data
                                                                                                                          Selects a correct and appropriate representation of data and justifies choice in relation to other appropriate choices.
                                                                                                                            Selects a correct and appropriate representation of the data and justify choice.
                                                                                                                              Selects a correct, yet inappropriate, representation of the data.
                                                                                                                                Selects an incorrect representation of the data.
                                                                                                                                  Data Analysis: Organize and Display Data
                                                                                                                                  Accurately transfers the data and uses correct scales and labels, presenting the data persuasively.
                                                                                                                                    Accurately transfers the data and uses correct scales and labels.
                                                                                                                                      Either accurately transfers the data or uses correct scales and labels.
                                                                                                                                        Neither accurately transfers the data nor uses correct scales and labels.
                                                                                                                                          Data Analysis: Read and Interpret Data
                                                                                                                                          Uses trends/relationships to evaluate inferences and predictions.
                                                                                                                                            Uses trends/relationships to answer questions, draw inferences, and make predictions.
                                                                                                                                              Answers literal questions and identifies trends/relationships.
                                                                                                                                                Answers literal questions.
                                                                                                                                                  Scientific Inquiry: Questions and Hypotheses
                                                                                                                                                  Generates relevant questions-based on observations and/or scientific knowledge-and forms a testable hypothesis or research statement applied in a new context.
                                                                                                                                                    Generates relevant questions-based on observations and/or scientific knowledge-and forms a testable hypothesis or research statement.
                                                                                                                                                      Generates relevant questions based on observations and/or scientific knowledge.
                                                                                                                                                        Generates questions related to the topic, but not based on observations or scientific knowledge.
                                                                                                                                                          Scientific Inquiry: Investigation Design
                                                                                                                                                          Evaluates, selects, or designs appropriate materials, procedures, or models for obtaining data that investigate the question applied in a new context.
                                                                                                                                                            Evaluates, selects, or designs appropriate materials, procedures, or models for obtaining data that investigate the question.
                                                                                                                                                              Selects or designs materials, procedures, or models for obtaining data that partially address the question.
                                                                                                                                                                Inappropriately selects or designs materials, procedures, or models for obtaining data.
                                                                                                                                                                  Scientific Inquiry: Data Presentation
                                                                                                                                                                  Data presentation accurately illustrates patterns or trends (for example: tables, graphs, statistics) in a way that recognizes the possibility of bias and correctly highlights the patterns and relationships.
                                                                                                                                                                    Data presentation accurately illustrates patterns or trends (for example: tables, graphs, statistics).
                                                                                                                                                                      Data presentation partially illustrates patterns or trends.
                                                                                                                                                                        Data presentation lacks organization.
                                                                                                                                                                          Scientific Inquiry: Analysis
                                                                                                                                                                          Accurately describes patterns or trends in data to formulate equations, state generalizations or relationships.
                                                                                                                                                                            Accurately describes patterns or trends in data.
                                                                                                                                                                              Partially describes patterns or trends in data.
                                                                                                                                                                                Describes irrelevant or nonexistent patterns or trends in data.
                                                                                                                                                                                  Scientific Inquiry: Conclusions
                                                                                                                                                                                  Uses data to draw a conclusion to support or refute the hypothesis or research statement, and apply to a broader context (external validity).
                                                                                                                                                                                    Uses data to draw a conclusion to support or refute the hypothesis or research statement (internal validity).
                                                                                                                                                                                      Uses data, but draws an invalid or incomplete conclusion (lacks internal validity).
                                                                                                                                                                                        Draws a conclusion without reference to data.
                                                                                                                                                                                          Scientific Inquiry: Refinements and Extensions
                                                                                                                                                                                          Evaluates components of an investigation (including experimental error); suggests improvements/modification, and implications for further research.
                                                                                                                                                                                            Evaluates components of an investigation (including experimental error) to suggest improvements/modifications, or implications for further research.
                                                                                                                                                                                              Evaluates components of an investigation (including experimental error),but suggestions for improvement/modifications or implications for further research is irrelevant.
                                                                                                                                                                                                Incompletely evaluates components of an investigation.
                                                                                                                                                                                                  Scientific Inquiry: Communication
                                                                                                                                                                                                  Uses data-based, logical arguments to justify and communicate all components of an investigation clearly, accurately, and completely supports, challenges, and responds to each other's ideas.
                                                                                                                                                                                                    Uses data-based, logical arguments to justify and communicate some components of an investigation clearly, accurately, and completely.
                                                                                                                                                                                                      Uses data-based, logical arguments to justify and communicate some components of an investigation.
                                                                                                                                                                                                        Communicates components of an investigation without data-based arguments.